Aloe Blacc @ Le Belmont

Aloe Blacc (Stones Throw)

To the masses, Aloe Blacc is best-known as the singer of the opening theme song for HBO's TV series "How to Make It in America." In part thanks to that, "I Need a Dollar" is considered the unofficial anthem for twenty-somethings on the grind. Having spent about sixteen years in the business, Aloe Blacc certainly knows something about the hustle. Blacc's years as an emcee has expanded into creating conscious music that spans the sounds of rap, soul, hip hop, jazz, and R&B, culminating in his most recent soul album, Good Things. In many ways, his stirring music is reminiscent of sounds from the sixties, but the lyrics are decidedly current, and tinged with a political slant. A graduate from the University of Southern California, Blacc and his distinct sound are quick to be described by music journalists and bloggers alike as smart, but his music is more than that, as Blacc straddles the worlds of art and life. Check out LOOKOUT's interview with Aloe Blacc and don't miss him live with his band The Grand Scheme on June 4th at Le Belmont.

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The Grand Scheme

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Guests

Le Belmont

Saturday June 4th

TICKETS: $24+tx/svc

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LOOKOUT Mixtape #4: Guilty & Fiend

Guilty and Fiend pump life blood into Montreal's music scene. Not only do these guys have deep crates, and coveted DJ experience, they rent and build some of the best sound in Montreal from the backroom at MOOG Audio.

This mix is a little session recorded at home under the influence of good company, drinks, food, & some other good stuff.  Old dusty vinyls & personal favorites. Disco, Soul, Funk, Boogie for you and yours, just in time for LOOKOUT's upcoming Aloe Blacc show where Guilty will be DJing after the live set, with Scott C of The Goods.

DOWNLOAD: (Right-Click to Save)
LOOKOUT Mixtape #4: "Change Your Mind" by Guilty & Fiend

Tracklist after the jump.

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Trackslisting:

01 Eddie Kendricks - Girl You Need a Change of Mind
02 The Gap Band - I Don't Believe You Wanna Get Up and Dance
03 P Funk All-Stars - Hydraulic Pump
04 Hot Chocolate - Heavens In The Back Seat of my Cadillac
05 Three Ounces of Love - Gimme Some Feeling
06 Double Exposure - My Love is Free
07 Gaz - Sing Sing
08 Locksmith - Far Beyond
09 The System - You're in my System
10 Class Action - Weekend
11 N/A - People Make the World Go Round
12 The Trammps - The Night the Lights Went Out (Dimitri from Paris Edit)
13 Sylvester - Over & Over
14 Universal Robot Band - Wanna be your Lover
15 Fiend Exclusive
16 Nick Striker Band - Little Bit of Jazz
17 Lakeside - All the Way Live
18 Brass Construction - Do That Thing

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Interview: Aloe Blacc

To the masses, Aloe Blacc is best-known as the singer of the opening theme song for HBO's TV series "How to Make It in America." In part thanks to that, "I Need a Dollar" is considered the unofficial anthem for twenty-somethings on the grind. Having spent about sixteen years in the business, Aloe Blacc certainly knows something about the hustle. Blacc's years as an emcee has expanded into creating conscious music that spans the sounds of rap, soul, hip hop, jazz, and R&B, culminating in his most recent soul album, Good Things. In many ways, his stirring music is reminiscent of sounds from the sixties, but the lyrics are decidedly current, and tinged with a political slant. A graduate from the University of Southern California, Blacc and his distinct sound are quick to be described by music journalists and bloggers alike as smart, but his music is more than that, as Blacc straddles the worlds of art and life. Check out LOOKOUT's interview with Aloe Blacc and don't miss him live with his band The Grand Scheme on November 16, 2010 at Le Belmont.

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You describe your music as "brand-new-old-soul." How is your music in dialogue with the past and how do you see yourself fitting in with "neo-soul" (if at all)?

I am a disciple of great and classic soul artists and my goal with this new album is to carry on an important tradition in soul music of making songs with social and political commentary. In my music, there are elements of some of my heroes like Al Green, Bill Withers, and Curtis Mayfield. These are just a few of the artists who have informed my style on Good Things. Quincy Jones gave some very important advice at an ASCAP conference I attended. He said that an aspiring artists should study the greats to learn all that they have done, and from this knowledge and understanding create something unique. I agree. I want to create something that is unique that has a quality of its own. I am sure that I will make soul music of all brands in the future from neo-soul to future soul and my very own brand-new-old-soul.

As a musician, do you feel like you have a responsibility to address political and social issues?

I think every adult with a conscience has a responsibility to address political and social issues. Whether you are a day labourer or a filmmaker, it is important to be aware of the issues that affect your life and have a constant dialogue about the problems and solutions. I feel like all public figures have a responsibility to address issues that affect their communities. It's important that people with access to speak loudly do so, to be a voice for the people who can not. I really appreciate someone like Michael Moore who, right or wrong, uses his access and visibility to start conversations about social, economic, and political ills. The first step is to be aware and start talking.

How did your do-it-yourself approach impact the final outcome of Good Things and your musical vision as a whole?

My first album, Shine Through, was one I wrote and produced all myself with the exception of a couple of beats from OHNO and Madlib. I worked with outside producers and musicians on Good Things and played a more hands-off role in the post-production aspect of the songs, which is much different from how I usually work, but I figured it was worth a try. I think that the beauty of working in this way is that I get to take these recordings to the next level in my live performance. It's fun to rework the songs with my band, The Grand Scheme, and produce the tracks in my own way with just the instruments we have on stage.

You've been getting quite a bit of mainstream success, especially thanks to "I Need a Dollar." As an indie artist, how do you negotiate between the industry (and the potential profits that come along with it) and your personal values and goals?

I will let you know the real answer when I get my first check for profits on the sale of the album. Album sales aren't what they used to be but I am extremely grateful for the popularity of the song. It's helping me to reach more people with my music and ultimately bring happiness to folks all over the world. I get emails and messages from fans who say that my music has helped them through hard times or brightened their day. This makes it all worth it, more than the money, or lack thereof. I look up to artists like Bono, Michael Jackson, and George Clooney who use their influence and money to make positive change in the world. I think this is the best way to deal with potential profits that come along with success.

How did focusing more exclusively on soul music in Good Things (as opposed to the multi-genre Shine Through) transform your artistry?

Focus is a good thing but I don't feel like it has transformed my artistry as much as it has transformed my growing audience's perception of me. I am still making songs in every genre because my muse has no stylistic filter. I am going to release another EMANON album with DJ Exile, which is all hip hop as usual, and every day I am coming up with new song ideas in all different genres. From a business perspective, focusing on one genre is helpful because it offers listeners the chance to develop a simple idea about me as an artist. The soul artist is an archetype that exists and is well-understood. Fortunately, a new music lover is born everyday and the tastes of music fans are broadening, so I imagine artists will not have to be so strict with genre-centrality.

Referring to the title of your album, what are the good things going on in your life right now?

Right now, I am able to travel the world with my friends who are all talented musicians. I get to write and create songs and deliver performances that make people happy. Things are quite good.

Aloe Blacc LIVE  in Montreal, with full band Grand Scheme, Maya Jupiter, Effusion A Cappella, DJs Scott C + Rilly Guilty.  November 16, 2010: More info
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ALOE BLACC ‘I NEED A DOLLAR’ TOUR

Tuesday, November 16 at 8:30pm

Le Belmont - 4483 St. Laurent

ALOE BLACC (Stones Throw Records)
LIVE with his FULL BAND as part of the 'I NEED A DOLLAR' Tour.

http://myspace.com/aloeblaccmusic
http://stonesthrow.com/aloeblacc

with

Grand Scheme
http://myspace.com/theegrandscheme

Maya Jupiter
http://myspace.com/mayajupiter

Effusion A Capella
http://effusion.ca/

+ Dance Party after the show w/ DJs

Scott C (The Goods) http://goodsradio.blogspot.com/
& Rilly Guilty (Lookout) http://soundcloud.com/rilly-guilty
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TICKETS

Select One
ONLINE STORES.  TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR

IN STORE
Cheap Thrills (2044 Metcalfe)
Off The Hook (1021-A St. Catherine W.)
Atom Heart (364-B Sherbrooke E.)
Phonopolis (5403-A Parc)
Moog Audio (3828 St. Laurent)


A first-generation American offspring of Panamanian parents, Aloe Blacc is an Orange County, CA native with international flair, having made fans all over the globe. The press has certainly taken notice with everyone from People Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, The Fader, The Guardian, Complex and Okayplayer – to name just a hand-full – weighing in with positive things to say.

The names Gil Scott-Heron, Gnarls Barkley, Andy Bey, Marvin Gaye, Bill Withers and Curtis Mayfield have all been bandied about as comparisons, but who Aloe is is a true modern original, telling today’s stories with an eye toward positive social change.

Good Things marks a musical maturation for Aloe, as well as an emphasis of the political over the personal, akin to the Marvin Gaye classic What’s Going On. On Good Things, Aloe reports on our current condition – from joblessness, homelessness to the general lack of compassion. Things lighten up on the airy “You Make Me Smile” and “Miss Fortune” but the overall tone of the album is one of underlying tension, most artfully and musically portrayed on the lead single, “I Need a Dollar,” which is the theme of HBO's new hit series "How to Make it in America."

“The best thing about How To Make It In America is the terrific song in the opening credits (Aloe Blacc ‘I Need A Dollar’). It has the sort of itchy desperation that should have driven the whole show.”
-PEOPLE

“’How to Make It in America,’ step one: Get a fantastic theme song from Aloe Blacc. It sounded like the type of thing you might discover deep in someone’s collection of old soul records on vinyl - maybe an obscure Bill Withers B-side we weren’t familiar with?”
- ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

“The wonderful, low-key OC soulster Aloe Blacc, a Stones Throw mainstay who has just found a new audience thanks to HBO’s How to Make it in America. Watch as he starts off all Motown and halfway through veers towards Curtis Mayfield territory, always respectful of the black pop roots but never stifled by them”
- LA WEEKLY

“Treads the line between the raw contemporary beats of Gnarls Barkley and the original soul boy grit of vocalist Andy Bey. Emotive class.”
- DJ MAGAZINE

“The breakout star of HBO’s “How to Make It in America” is likely to be Aloe Blacc. The younger rapper-singer-songwriter is responsible for the criminally infectious “I Need a Dollar,” which is gonna propel Blacc to a Talib Kweli/Mos Def level”
- HIT FIX

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EXILE & HIS MPC (Live!) w/ RILLY GUILTY

L.A. based virtuoso DJ and producer Exile will be performing a very special live MPC set in Montreal on Friday, October 1st at Blizzarts in support of his latest release AM/FM – a collection of original material directly inspired by his hometown's radio airwaves.

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Exile’s early exposure to hip hop grew into the desire to create the music he loved himself. At the age of 18, Exile met up with rapper, Aloe Blacc, 16 years old at the time. With a one-button sampler and a four-track they formed Emanon and started making their own albums. Exile, then met 19 year old rapper Blu and together started work on his solo effort Dirty Science, featuring Slum Village, MED and Ghostface Killa. Together they also made the critically acclaimed classic, Blu and Exile -Below The Heavens. After producing tracks for artists such as Mobb Deep, Jurassic 5, Akon and Snoop Dogg; he continues to excel in the art of creating music with his first instrumental album entitled Radio. Radio immediately made an impact, and now we bring you AM/FM.

AM/FM is a collection of reworked/remixed/new compositions and interpretations of Radio tracks. AM/FM features, Alchemist, Evidence, Aloe Blacc, Shafiq Husayn, Samiyam, Blu, DJ Day, Fashawn, Free The Robots, Clutchy Hopkins, Muhsinah, Take, and many more. 21 amazing Exile tracks, that feature friends and inspirational peers which Exile himself has compiled. If you liked Radio, AM/FM will definitely take you through another musical journey

VIDEO:

Exile – MJ Tribute

Exile- Bounce (Live on MPC)

Exile – RBMA demo

Exile Flips “A Milli”

Exile – “We’re all in Power” Music Video (STOP MOTION)

Exile (Live) w/ Rilly Guilty
FRIDAY OCTOBER 1ST
Blizzarts - 3956 St. Laurent
SHOWTIME  10PM
$5

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